Past Events in 2018

CANCELED - Extending our Vision to a Galaxy of Planets

Date: 
Wednesday, December 05, 2018 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Karl Stapelfeldt
Affiliation: 
JPL
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

The most obvious method of studying extrasolar planets - directly imaging them alongside their parent star - is also the most difficult. Image contrasts exceeding a billion to one, at subarcsecond separations, are required to detect an analog of our solar system in reflected starlight. Following the charge of the Astro2010 decadal survey, the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) is tasked with developing the technology and precursor science needed to realize the goals of directly imaging Earth analogs and characterizing their atmospheres for habitability and the presence of life.

A Light in the Dark - Massive Star Birth Through Cosmic Time

Date: 
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Jonathan Tan
Affiliation: 
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, & University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Location: 
N232, R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

Massive stars have played a dominant role in shaping our universe since its earliest times, but there is still no consensus on the mechanism by which they form. I review the physics important for massive star formation and the intimate connection this process has with star cluster formation. I then focus on a particular theoretical model, Turbulent Core Accretion, which assumes the initial conditions are massive, turbulent, magnetized cores of gas and dust that are reasonably close to virial equilibrium.

Could Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) Be Responsible for Anomalous 3.4 μm Emission Bands in Protoplanetary Nebulae?

Date: 
Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 9:00am PST
Speaker: 
Christopher Materese
Affiliation: 
NASA GSFC
Location: 
N/A
Event Type: 
Teletalk

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to be ubiquitous in space therefore represent an important class of molecules for the field of astrochemistry. PAHs are relatively stable under interstellar conditions, account for a significant fraction of the known universe’s molecular carbon inventory, and are believed responsible for numerous telltale interstellar infrared emission bands. PAHs can be subdivided into numerous subclasses, including Hydrogenated PAHs (Hn-PAHs).

What Controls the Rate of Star Formation: Common Features and Common Myths

Date: 
Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 3:30pm PST
Speaker: 
Neal Evans
Affiliation: 
University of Texas
Location: 
N232 R103
Event Type: 
Colloquium

The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test which tracers provide the best predictor of star formation rate.

Pages